Carpet Style

Carpet Styles

When you shop for carpet at 'The Carpet Shed' you'll find a wealth of colours, textures and styles therefore, we recommend you think of carpet as a fashion investment. After all, you're not simply covering your floors - you're developing the beauty of your home, and expressing your own personal decorating style. Think of carpet as a fashion item.

Carpet Quality

Carpet Quality

While colour and price are essential factors when choosing your carpet, the right colour at the lowest price does not necessarily represent the best value. The way the carpet actually performs when it is on your floor should be your primary consideration.
It's not easy to predict how well a carpet will perform in your home but the better the quality of fibre and the denser it's packed,the better the carpet will perform. Low quality carpet is generally thin and lightweight.
Virtually any carpet looks good when it's first installed, so the longer it stays looking good, the greater its real value. Don't try to economise in high-traffic, heavy-wear areas of your home like halls and family rooms.
Buy the best quality you can afford because if you have to replace the carpet it will cost you more in the long run not only for the cost of the replacement carpet, but the cost and inconvenience of another installation.
A cheap, low quality carpet can wear out quickly and prove to be more costly in the long run. Remember, you get what you pay for.

Carpet Fibres

Carpet Fibres

There are three basic types of carpet fibre: Natural, Synthetic and Man Made.

Natural Fibres: Originally there was only one carpet fibre - wool. The premier fibre for carpets: luxurious, soft and warm with a natural 'crimp' making it resilient and better able to recover from compression marks.
Wool is used in 100% form but is more familiar in an 80% mix with another man made fibre, usually nylon, to improve durability. The latest development is to blend 80% wool with 10% nylon and 10% hot-melt polyester. This construction gives better long term appearance retention and reduces fibre shedding; thus preserving the 'body' of the carpet.
Other natural fibres include Sisal, Coir, Jute and Seagrass which are becoming popular.

Carpet Fibres

Synthetic Fibres: These fibres are produced as a by product of the petrochemical industry, being oil based such as Nylon, Acrylic, Polyester and Polypropylene.
Acrylic
The man made fibre most like wool in appearance and feel. Wears well but not as durable as nylon. It soils easily and is usually blended with wool rather than manufactured in 100% form.
Nylon
Widely used in carpets because of its versatility and performance as well as being very hard wearing. Nylon (polyamide) is blended with other fibres but is quite often used on its own.
A low cost fibre, it dyes easily and wears extremely well.
Polyester
A fibre less suited to high traffic areas so quite often used in bedroom carpets and heavy weight Saxonies. Soft to the touch and warm, not as durable as Nylon.
Polypropylene
Polypropylene is a very versatile fibre due to its strength, stain resistant and anti static properties. Not as hard wearing as nylon but very suitable in heavy soil areas or sensitive electronic environments.
Carpets in this fibre are predominantly made in 100% form as a low level loop and often combined with wool as a 50/50 wool/polypropylene or 80/20 wool/polypropylene mix. Polypropylene is moisture resistant, rot proof, colour fast and will resist bleach. Often used as outdoor carpeting for swimming pool surrounds/patios/balconies etc.